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Let’s talk engorgement! Ouch! Engorgement ...

Let’s talk engorgement! Ouch!

Engorgement is like the extreme version of milk full breasts. The most common time for this to occur is within the first 48 hours after the mature milk surges (“comes in”) around day 3-5 postpartum. But it could also happen at other times, for example, when there are changes in feeding frequency, a separation of the nursing couplet, mom out of town for work, baby weaning…

It’s important to understand that engorgement IS milk filling the breast, but it’s also SWELLING! This swelling can make the skin taught and shiny, it can puff up the areola and flatten the nipple. In addition to being incredibly uncomfortable, it makes it more difficult for baby to latch - which means less milk removal - which means more engorgement. ?

So what do you do about it?? You need to treat BOTH symptoms - the milk fullness and the swelling.

Fullness is treated by frequent effective removal of the milk. Including hand expression for comfort. (Check out yesterday’s posts!!)

Swelling is treated with gentle massage (video and step by step instructions to come), cold compresses after nursing/pumping, reverse pressure softening (photos and video to come), clean cabbage leaves (science on this is still inconclusive though anecdotally many report positive results), and NSAIDS assuming you have no allergies or contraindications.

So what did you find to be most helpful when you’ve experienced engorgement?
Breast drawing by mikicon from the Noun Project
#ibclc #breastfeeding #breastfeedinghelp #breastfeedingtips #breastmilk #chestfeeding #humanmilk #lactation #humanlactation #lactationconsultant #nursingparent #newbaby #letstalklactation #magicmilk #mothersmilk #normalizebreastfeeding #supportisbest #preparedpregnancy #infantgrowth #handexpression #pumping #exclusivepumping #colostrum #newbornfeeding #milkmaker #feedthebabies #postpartum #engorgement #handexpression

Let’s talk engorgement! Ouch! 

Engorgement is like the extreme version of milk full breasts. The most common time for this to occur is within the first 48 hours after the mature milk surges (“comes in”) around day 3-5 postpartum. But it could also happen at other times, for example, when there are changes in feeding frequency, a separation of the nursing couplet, mom out of town for work, baby weaning… 

It’s important to understand that engorgement IS milk filling the breast, but it’s also SWELLING! This swelling can make the skin taught and shiny, it can puff up the areola and flatten the nipple. In addition to being incredibly uncomfortable, it makes it more difficult for baby to latch - which means less milk removal - which means more engorgement. ?

So what do you do about it?? You need to treat BOTH symptoms - the milk fullness and the swelling. 

Fullness is treated by frequent effective removal of the milk. Including hand expression for comfort. (Check out yesterday’s posts!!)

Swelling is treated with gentle massage (video and step by step instructions to come), cold compresses after nursing/pumping, reverse pressure softening (photos and video to come), clean cabbage leaves (science on this is still inconclusive though anecdotally many report positive results), and NSAIDS assuming you have no allergies or contraindications. 

So what did you find to be most helpful when you’ve experienced engorgement?
Breast drawing by mikicon from the Noun Project
#ibclc #breastfeeding #breastfeedinghelp #breastfeedingtips #breastmilk #chestfeeding #humanmilk #lactation #humanlactation #lactationconsultant #nursingparent #newbaby #letstalklactation #magicmilk #mothersmilk #normalizebreastfeeding #supportisbest #preparedpregnancy #infantgrowth #handexpression #pumping #exclusivepumping #colostrum #newbornfeeding #milkmaker #feedthebabies #postpartum #engorgement #handexpression